Ful Nabed: Sukkot Fava Bean Soup

standard Thursday October 20th, 2016 Leave a response
Photo by Neven Mrgan https://www.flickr.com/photos/neven/
Photo by Neven Mrgan https://www.flickr.com/photos/neven/

When the Ancient Israelites left Egypt, they carried the memories of the foods they enjoyed with them. Of all the vegetables, they missed fava beans the most. Fava beans, which have been in Egypt for over 8,000 years, have been found in the tombs of the pharaohs as part of the indispensable items that must be brought to the afterlife. Egyptian Jews have retained the tradition of eating fava beans when celebrating happy occasions. On the sixth night of Sukkot, a delicious soup made with fava beans, called Ful Nabed, is served.

Ful Nabed: Fava Bean Soup

  • 2 cans of fava beans
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 5 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. ground cumin
  • 4 tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp. minced parsley
  1. Pour the contents of the canned fava beans into a blender and puree.
  2. Heat the puree in a pot.
  3. Stir in the garlic, cumin, oil and lemon juice.
  4. If the soup is too thick, add some water.
  5. Simmer for 5 minutes.

Adapted from Saad Fayed.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

The Healthy Break Fast

standard Monday October 10th, 2016 Leave a response
Photo: Katrin Morenz
Photo: Katrin Morenz

At the conclusion of the 25-hour Yom Kippur fast, your body deserves some tender loving care. The foods that are traditionally served to break the fast do not necessarily provide this. Here are some tips on the scientifically healthiest ways to replenish your body with nutrients.

Photo: Derek Jensen (Tysto)

Photo: Derek Jensen (Tysto)


The first thing to give your parched body is water. Indulge in one or two glasses of water before you approach the food.

Photo: Tracy Hunter

Photo: Tracy Hunter

Fresh Fruit

While fresh fruit is usually served toward the end of the meal, following a fast it is good to begin with the fruit. Fruits are easy to digest, and give your body additional fluids and sugars. Apples, grapes, watermelon, pears, and melons are good choices. Avoid citrus fruits, as they may be too acidic at this point.

Photo: Connoisseur 4 The Cure

Photo: Connoisseur 4 The Cure

Fresh Vegetables

A salad with a base of romaine lettuce, kale, or Swiss chard will provide vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients to bring your body back into equilibrium. Add some chopped raw carrots, celery, and beets. Avoid commercial salad dressings, which contain too much salt. Make your own simple dressing with salt, pepper, olive oil, and a little lemon, or a yogurt (with live cultures) dressing.

Photo: Marie-Lan Nguyen

Photo: Marie-Lan Nguyen


Eggs are the most complete sources of protein. They are easy to digest, and quick to prepare. Serve some boiled eggs with the salad to renew your energy.

Vegetable Soup

Whip up a quick water-based vegetable soup with whole grains such as unpearled barley or brown rice and legumes such as lentils or beans. Use fresh vegetables, and to save time, canned legumes and quick cooking brown rice or barley.

Here is a recipe for a quick and easy vegetable soup that you can make from scratch:

Photo: Katrin Morenz

Photo: Katrin Morenz

Vegetable Soup
Adapted from About Food

  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 2 celery ribs, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 sweet potato, chopped
  • 1 zucchini, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 8 cups water
  • 1 tsp. dried thyme
  • 1 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1 dried bay leaf
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  1. Heat the oil in a heavy pot.
  2. Add all the chopped vegetables.
  3. Sauté for 4 minutes.
  4. Stir in the dry spices.
  5. Pour in the 8 cups of water.
  6. Bring the soup to a boil, and then simmer for 15 minutes.

You may add cooked beans, lentils, or garbanzo beans.
Serve with quick cooking brown rice or another whole grain.

Sephardic Stuffed Rosh Hashanah Vegetables

standard Sunday September 25th, 2016 Leave a response

51yotxvdwal-_sx432_bo1204203200_Some Sephardic families have the tradition of not preparing any black foods during Rosh Hashanah in order to avoid the appearance of mourning. The mothers and grandmothers of these clans are famous for their delicious stuffed vegetables. For Rosh Hashanah, this dish is still prepared, using everything that is in season, except eggplants, black olives and dark raisins. Stella Cohen, the author of Stella’s Sephardic Table, shares her recipe for the queens of stuffed vegetables.

The name of this recipe in Judeo-Spanish is Tomat y Sevoya Reynadas, which in fact, means “tomatoes and onions that are transformed into queens.” This recipe originated on the island ofRhodes, now a Greek island, which for centuries prior to the Holocaust, had a large Sephardic population that spoke Judeo-Spanish. When you bite into this traditional dish, you will understand exactly why it was considered fit for a royal palate.

Stuffed Tomatoes and Onions

Adapted from “Stella’s Sephardic Table,” by Stella Cohen

  • 10 tomatoes
  • 10 onions

For the meat filling

  • 1 lb. ground beef
  • 4 tbsp. minced parsley
  • 1 scallion, sliced
  • 1 tomato, seeded and grated
  • 4 slices of white bread, dipped in water and cut up
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. pepper

For the vegetable base

  • 1 onion, cubed
  • 4 scallions, sliced
  • 2 stalks celery, sliced
  • 2 potatoes, cubed
  • 1/4 cup stewed tomatoes in their juice
  • 3 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1/2 cup hot water
  • 1/2 tsp. sugar
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Additional ingredients

  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  1. Peel and hollow out the onions, but do not discard the insides of the onions. Instead, save for Step 5.
  2. Hollow out the tomatoes, but do not discard the insides of the tomatoes. Instead, save for Step 5.
  3. Mix all the ingredients for the meat filling in a large bowl.
  4. Heat the olive oil in a heavy pot.
  5. Chop up the pieces of onions and tomatoes, and place them in the oil with all the other vegetables for the filling.
  6. Add the stewed tomatoes and hot water.
  7. Season with the sugar, salt, and pepper.
  8. Simmer for 20 minutes.
  9. Stuff the tomatoes and onions with the meat mixture.
  10. Heat some olive oil in a heavy pan.
  11. Dip the tops of the filled tomatoes and onions in flour, then egg.
  12. Fry the stuffed vegetables until golden brown.
  13. Drain on paper towels.
  14. Arrange the fried stuffed vegetables in the pot with the vegetable base.
  15. Add some hot chicken or vegetable stock.
  16. Bring to a boil, and then simmer for 45 minutes.
  17. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  18. Uncover the pot, and place in the oven for 15 minutes to brown the tops of the vegetables.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Lure Your Bashert with Roasted Grapes

standard Wednesday August 17th, 2016 Leave a response
Photo credit: F Delventhal
Photo credit: F Delventhal

640px-PikiWiki_Israel_3078_Ein_HahoreshSince the days of the Temple in Jerusalem, single women celebrated the beginning of the grape harvest by wearing white dresses and dancing in the vineyards. They were hoping to attract the attention of potential husbands. If pleasing the eye did not prove to be enough, some of them could try to reach their man’s heart through his stomach. An easy and delicious dish that was prepared during the grape harvest in Ancient Israel was freshly picked grapes, sprinkled with whatever herbs were growing in the vicinity, and roasted over an open fire. This was a savory treat, enjoyed with freshly baked flatbread. Its heady aroma could attract the men that may have been oblivious to the beauty of the Israelite women.

This tradition continues — in a more modernized form — in Israel today. When the sun sets this year on August 18, it will mark the beginning of the holiday of Tu b’Av, the Jewish celebration of love. Men and women dress in white and participate in various community events in the hopes of meeting their bashert (soulmate).

A fun activity you can try is to visit a farm that will let you pick your own grapes. If that is not possible, visit a farmer’s market, and buy the freshest grapes you can find. Roast them on your barbecue grill or in your oven.

Photo credit: F Delventhal

Photo credit: F Delventhal

Roasted Grapes

  • 1 cup fresh grapes
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp. vinegar
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 °F.
  2. Mix all the ingredients.
  3. Place in an oven-safe dish.
  4. Roast for 15 minutes.
  5. Serve with fresh pita bread, Israeli goat cheese and olives.

Adapted from The View from Great Island

From Spain to Salonika, a disappearing Shavuot tradition revisited

standard Tuesday June 14th, 2016 Leave a response

PHILADELPHIA — Nicknamed “The Queen of Israel,” Salonika was one of the greatest Jewish cities that ever existed. A melting pot of Jewish communities, the trade hub was a haven for Jews following the 1492 Expulsions from Spain and Portugal. In this cosmopolitan Jewish community, the once-again prospering Spanish and Portuguese Jews could maintain their Sephardic traditions and customs. Read the rest here.

Israeli Cheesecake for Shavuot

standard Tuesday May 31st, 2016 Leave a response
Photo by Christian Guthier
Photo by Christian Guthier

Shavuot is the celebration of the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai. It is also an agricultural holiday marking the beginning of the wheat harvest in Israel. It is traditional to eat dairy products during Shavuot. Israelis celebrate Shavuot with an iconic cheesecake called Ugat Gvina (cheese cake). They can thank the German Templers for introducing the most important ingredient in this cake to Israel.

In 1868 the first group of these German Protestants settled at the foot of Mount Carmel. They established a colony there, followed by Sarona, near Jaffa, and the Valley of Refaim in Jerusalem. They were called “Templers” since they hoped to hasten the coming of the Messiah by facilitating the rebuilding of the Temple in Jerusalem. The Templers (no relation to the medieval Knights Templars) created the Jaffa orange brand and founded the first dairy farm with cows in Ottoman Palestine. Sheep and goats had exclusively provided milk up to this point. The Germans made one of their favorite dairy products at this dairy: quark cheese.

Quark cheese is a soft fresh cheese, traditionally made without rennet. It is popular throughout Northern Europe. Milk that has soured is slowly warmed until it curdles. The mix is strained through a cheesecloth, and then served. Quark cheese is lower fat than cream cheese. It has a lighter, drier, and grainier texture. The Vermont Creamery makes a kosher Quark cheese. This is the essential ingredient that gives Israeli cheesecake its light texture and distinctive flavor.

What I think of as “Israeli cheesecake” is really a German recipe introduced by the Templers.

Photo by kersy83

Photo by kersy83

Israeli Cheesecake
Adapted from allrecipes

  • 18 oz. Quark cheese
  • 2 1/8 cups milk
  • 6 tbsp. butter
  • 3 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 1/3 cups flour
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1 tbsp. Vanilla sugar
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 3 oz. vanilla pudding mix (not instant)


  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Coat a 9 inch cake pan with oil.
  3. In a large bowl, combine butter, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 egg, flour, and baking powder.
  4. Press into the bottom and sides of the cake pan.
  5. In a clean bowl, mix the quark cheese, vegetable oil, 3/4 cup sugar, vanilla sugar, pudding mix, egg yolks, 1 egg, milk, and lemon juice.
  6. Pour the mixture over the crust.
  7. Bake for 60 minutes.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Lag BaOmer Poike

standard Saturday May 21st, 2016 Leave a response

Israel owes one of its most popular Lag BaOmer traditions to the Jewish community of South Africa. When the State of Israel was established in 1948, the proudly Zionist South African Jews provided it with the most financial support per capita of any other community in the diaspora.

Photo: אסף .צ By אסף.צ - אני צילמתי, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4116566

Photo: אסף .צ By אסף.צ – אני צילמתי, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4116566

Just as importantly, the South African olim introduced the potjie(pronounced “poike”) to Israel. This special pot, and the stew named for it, is an indispensable part of the Israeli Lag BaOmer celebration.

A potjie is a type of Dutch oven that was brought to South Africa by the Boer colonists from the Netherlands in the 1800s. This cast iron cauldron means “little pot.” It has three small legs and a wire handle. It can be nestled among the coals of a campfire or suspended over a flame.

To prepare the potjie stew, a little oil is heated in the Dutch oven. Then, lamb cubes are browned. Some alcohol is added for flavor, usually beer, sherry, or dessert wine. The potjie chef seasons the stew, usually very conservatively. Amazingly, garlic is not a popular ingredient. The pot is covered tightly with the lid, and the stew is left to steam slowly. It is not customary to stir the contents of the pot, so that when the potjie is ready, there are layers of flavors in the stew.

Photo: Chrstpher Jones

Photo: Chrstpher Jones

Lamb Potjie
Adapted from Joburg South

  • 4 pounds cubed lamb
    4 tbsp. olive oil
    4 onions, chopped
    5 celery stalks, chopped
    4 carrots, peeled and chopped
    3 potatoes, chopped
    1/2 lb. green beans, with the ends cut off
    2 fresh bay leaves
    2 sprigs fresh thyme
    1/2 cup flour
    2 cups chicken stock
    1 cup red wine
    1 tsp. ground coriander
    1 tsp. salt
    1 tsp. ground cumin
  1. Heat the pot over medium hot coals.
    Combine the flour, salt, cumin, and coriander.
    Coat the lamb cubes with the flour mixture.
    Heat the olive oil in the pot.
    Brown the lamb cubes.
    Take the lamb cubes out of the pot and set aside.
    Place the onions and celery in the pot, and fry them a little bit.
    Add the lamb cubes to the vegetables.
    Pour in the stock, red wine, fresh thyme, and bay leaves.
    Close the lid tightly and allow to cook for one hour.
    Add the potatoes.
    After 30 minutes, add the carrots.
    Cook for 15 minutes, and add the green beans.
    Wait 10 minutes.
    Serve with rice, noodles, or fresh pita bread.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Freedom and Kitniyot For All!

standard Friday April 15th, 2016 Leave a response
Photo by Miansari66 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Miansari66
Photo by Miansari66 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Miansari66
Photo by CSIRO

Photo by CSIRO

In 1989 the Law Committee of the Rabbinical Assembly of Israel issued a responsum to the question Ashkenazi Jews ask every Passover: “Why are we not permitted to eat kitniyot(legumes), while Sephardic Jews are?” The Rabbinical Assembly concluded that this is a “mistaken custom” and that Ashkenazi Jews are permitted to consume kitniyot as well. This responsum technically only applies to people living in Israel. Ashkenazi Jews who live elsewhere, will need to clear this with their own rabbi if they would also like to change their family’s custom. Also this Passover season for the first time the Conservative movement has authorized Ashkenazi Jews to eat kitniyot.

If we go back to the source, the Torah has the following to say about chametz: First, we are told not to eat unleavened bread during the seven days of Passover, and to remove all leavened bread from our homes. Jews living in the diaspora added an additional day to make sure they complied with the observance of Passover on the right days of the Hebrew Calendar.

Seven days shall ye eat unleavened bread; howbeit the first day ye shall put away leaven out of your houses; for whosoever eateth leavened bread from the first day until the seventh day, that soul shall be cut off from Israel. (Exodus 12:15).

Then the Torah instructs us not to have any leavened bread on our property or temporary place of residence during the seven (or eight in the diaspora) days of Passover.

Seven days shall there be no leaven found in your houses; for whosoever eateth that which is leavened, that soul shall be cut off from the congregation of Israel, whether he be a sojourner, or one that is born in the land.

The significance of Passover is summarized by Moses in Exodus 13:3:

And Moses said unto the people: ‘Remember this day, in which ye came out from Egypt, out of the house of bondage; for by strength of hand the LORD brought you out from this place; there shall no leavened bread be eaten.’

The rabbis who wrote the Mishnah (10-220 CE) ruled that five types of grain were permitted for baking matzah. These are wheat, barley, spelt, rye, and oats. When these grains are mixed with water they ferment very quickly. They instructed that the dough must be mixed and baked in eighteen minutes or the matzah would not be considered “unleavened bread.” When analyzing rice and sesame seeds, these rabbis noted that when these were combined with water, they decayed, they did not ferment. Therefore, they were not considered chametz.

In the thirteenth century, the rabbis of Provence prohibited the consumption of rice andkitniyot during Passover. This custom spread throughout Europe. No clear reason for this new prohibition was ever provided. Some rabbis in other cities objected to this ruling, saying that it was a mistaken custom, a foolish custom, and an unnecessary stringency.

The question facing the rabbis today is, may they change a mistaken custom? They concluded that they may and they must. Doing away with this custom will return the focus of Passover to the original intent of the Torah. It will enhance the enjoyment of Passover by offering a greater variety of foods. The new ruling will make the celebration more affordable. One of the best results of this initiative is that it will lessen friction between the Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews, who will finally be able to enjoy the same foods together at the Seder.

I am an “Ashkefardic” Jew, from a “mixed” family. The Passover battles of my grandparent’s generation are legendary. The preparations for the Seder always started with a fight, which wasn’t even about the relatives. The topic was the same every year: rice or potatoes. The end result was a lose-lose truce, neither rice nor potatoes. Matzah was the only starch served during the festive meal.

Thanks to this new ruling, there may be more shalom bayit, or peace in the home. Some of thekitniyot permitted by the Sephardic Passover Guide are “Anise, Beans, Black Eyed Peas, Buckwheat, Canola Oil, Caraway, Chickpeas, Confectioners’ sugar with corn starch, Coriander, Corn, Corn Syrup, Cumin, Fennel, Fenugreek, Flax Seeds, Hemp, Kasha, Lentils, Licorice, Millet, Mustard, Peanuts, Popcorn, Poppy Seeds, Rice, Sesame Seeds, Snow Peas, Soy Oil, Corn Oil, Soy, String Beans, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu (from soy).”

This is a wonderful development for vegetarians and vegans. For the uninitiated, here are some of the most beloved recipes with kitniyot for Passover.

In the Jewish communities of Sicily, Egypt, Turkey, and Greece fava beans ripened just as Passover was celebrated. It was traditional to include a dish with fava beans at the Seder.

Photo by Boo Lee

Photo by Boo Lee

Braised Artichokes with Fava Beans (Anjinara con Aves)
Adapted from “The Sephardic Kitchen” by Rabbi Robert Sternberg

  • 8 artichokes
  • 1 pound fava beans
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 4 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh dill, minced
  • Salt
  • Black pepper
  1. Place all the ingredients except the salt, pepper, and fresh dill in a large pot.
  2. Bring to a boil, and then reduce the heat to a simmer.
  3. Cover the pot and cook for 45 minutes.
  4. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and dill.

The Syrian Jewish community has a beautiful rice dish reserved for special occasions such as the Passover Seder. This dish is famous for the beautiful golden hue and rich aroma extracted from the saffron it is spiced with.

Saffron Rice (Riz w’Zafran)
Adapted from Aromas of Aleppo by Poopa Dweck

  • 1 cup white rice
  • 3 saffron threads
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • Pinch of ground cardamom
  • 1/2 cup toasted almond, pine nuts, or pistachios
  1. Heat the olive oil in a heavy pot.
  2. Add the onion, and sauté over medium heat until translucent.
  3. Pour 1 1/2 cups of cold water into the pot.
  4. Bring to a boil.
  5. Season with the saffron, cinnamon stick, salt, and cardamom.
  6. Add the rice and bring back to a boil.
  7. Lower the heat and allow to simmer for 30 minutes.
  8. Sprinkle with the toasted nuts when ready to serve.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Bake Your Own Matza in a Pop-Up Passover Tabun

standard Monday April 4th, 2016 2 responses

In my family, the Passover celebration begins long before the Seder. Preparing for our festive meal is a big part of the fun. One of my favorite traditions is our annual matza baking party. My husband Howard designs and builds a temporary cinder-block tabun (Biblical oven) especially for the occasion. I aspire to bake a  matza with a really authentic flavor. In order to get that, I look for flour milled from heirloom seeds that were native to Ancient Egypt.

Stone oven by Jarkko Laine

Stone oven by Jarkko Laine

How should you build your own tabun? Here is an easy guide for a 1-hour brick oven. Be sure to use fireproof bricks! I suggest that you use natural wood charcoal, although the Ancient Israelites used dry dung for fuel.

In Deuteronomy 16:3, matza is described as lechem oni, or “bread of poverty.” What was the bread of poverty in Ancient Egypt? According to the Karaites, barley was the grain of the poor. They bake their matza from the flour of this Ancient Egyptian staple. I wanted to try it this year, so we baked barley matza.

Karaite Barley Matza

  1. Set a timer for eighteen minutes. From the moment the water touches the flour, that is the total time permitted for the preparation of kosher for Passover matza.
  2. Place the flour in a bowl.
  3. Pour the water into the flour, and knead it quickly.
  4. Pinch off an olive-sized piece of dough.
  5. Say the blessing for taking challah:

    Baruch Ata A-Do-Nay Elo-haynu Melech HaOlam Asher Kidishanu B’Mitzvotav V’Tziyvanu L’Hafrish Challah, Harei Zeh Challah. (Blessed are You, Lord our G-d, King of the Universe, Who has sanctified us with His commandments and commanded us to separate Challah, this is Challah).

  6. You must burn this piece of dough completely, in a fire that is separate from the one you are using to bake the matza.
  7. Pull off plum-sized balls of dough.
  8. Flatten them with your hands.
  9. Pierce the flattened dough all over with a fork.
  10. Place in the hot tabun.
  11. The matza is ready when it is crisp, and slightly browned.

As we pulled the rustic, golden-brown flat breads out of the oven, their delicious aroma wafted around our yard. The tabun-baked barley matza was softer than the store-bought wheat type. We ate our matza hot, right as it emerged from the charcoals. There was a satisfying crunch around the edges as we bit into it. It had a hearty, slightly nutty flavor. For me, this “bread of poverty” is a delicacy!

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice

Persian Purim Halvah

standard Monday March 7th, 2016 Leave a response

What do Persian Jews prepare for each other to celebrate Purim? I have always wondered about this. The Persian Jewish community is very insular, and I have never had the opportunity to ask. Thanks to the development of social media, it was possible for me to approach a group of Persian Jewish women to inquire. The special Purim treat of the Persian Jews is saffron halvah.

Saffron halvah is not like the white sesame halvah I am used to from Israel. A base of flour and oil is cooked, and then flavored with nuts and spices. Its consistency is more akin to that of a brownie. The resulting halvah has a deep golden tone, and is redolent of saffron and rosewater. The soft pastry is accentuated with the crunch of almonds and pistachios. It is a Purim treat that truly harkens back to Queen Esther’s palace.

Saffron Halvah
Adapted from the Iran Chamber Society

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 7/8 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup rosewater
  • 12 threads of saffron
  • 1 tablespoon almonds, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon pistachios, crushed
  1. Heat the oil in a heavy pot.
  2. Mix in the flour.
  3. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly.
  4. When the dough thickens, turn off the flame.
  5. In a separate pot, bring the water and sugar to a boil.
  6. Add the saffron to release its golden color and aroma.
  7. Add the rosewater.
  8. Turn off the heat.
  9. Pour the sugar syrup into the dough.
  10. Mix thoroughly.
  11. Pour the halvah onto a serving platter.
  12. Flatten the dough with a spatula or spoon.
  13. Garnish with crushed almonds and pistachios.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.