From Spain to Salonika, a disappearing Shavuot tradition revisited

standard Tuesday June 14th, 2016 Leave a response

PHILADELPHIA — Nicknamed “The Queen of Israel,” Salonika was one of the greatest Jewish cities that ever existed. A melting pot of Jewish communities, the trade hub was a haven for Jews following the 1492 Expulsions from Spain and Portugal. In this cosmopolitan Jewish community, the once-again prospering Spanish and Portuguese Jews could maintain their Sephardic traditions and customs. Read the rest here.

Israeli Cheesecake for Shavuot

standard Tuesday May 31st, 2016 Leave a response
Photo by Christian Guthier
Photo by Christian Guthier

Shavuot is the celebration of the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai. It is also an agricultural holiday marking the beginning of the wheat harvest in Israel. It is traditional to eat dairy products during Shavuot. Israelis celebrate Shavuot with an iconic cheesecake called Ugat Gvina (cheese cake). They can thank the German Templers for introducing the most important ingredient in this cake to Israel.

In 1868 the first group of these German Protestants settled at the foot of Mount Carmel. They established a colony there, followed by Sarona, near Jaffa, and the Valley of Refaim in Jerusalem. They were called “Templers” since they hoped to hasten the coming of the Messiah by facilitating the rebuilding of the Temple in Jerusalem. The Templers (no relation to the medieval Knights Templars) created the Jaffa orange brand and founded the first dairy farm with cows in Ottoman Palestine. Sheep and goats had exclusively provided milk up to this point. The Germans made one of their favorite dairy products at this dairy: quark cheese.

Quark cheese is a soft fresh cheese, traditionally made without rennet. It is popular throughout Northern Europe. Milk that has soured is slowly warmed until it curdles. The mix is strained through a cheesecloth, and then served. Quark cheese is lower fat than cream cheese. It has a lighter, drier, and grainier texture. The Vermont Creamery makes a kosher Quark cheese. This is the essential ingredient that gives Israeli cheesecake its light texture and distinctive flavor.

What I think of as “Israeli cheesecake” is really a German recipe introduced by the Templers.

Photo by kersy83

Photo by kersy83

Israeli Cheesecake
Adapted from allrecipes

  • 18 oz. Quark cheese
  • 2 1/8 cups milk
  • 6 tbsp. butter
  • 3 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 1/3 cups flour
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1 tbsp. Vanilla sugar
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 3 oz. vanilla pudding mix (not instant)

 

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Coat a 9 inch cake pan with oil.
  3. In a large bowl, combine butter, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 egg, flour, and baking powder.
  4. Press into the bottom and sides of the cake pan.
  5. In a clean bowl, mix the quark cheese, vegetable oil, 3/4 cup sugar, vanilla sugar, pudding mix, egg yolks, 1 egg, milk, and lemon juice.
  6. Pour the mixture over the crust.
  7. Bake for 60 minutes.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Lag BaOmer Poike

standard Saturday May 21st, 2016 Leave a response

Israel owes one of its most popular Lag BaOmer traditions to the Jewish community of South Africa. When the State of Israel was established in 1948, the proudly Zionist South African Jews provided it with the most financial support per capita of any other community in the diaspora.

Photo: אסף .צ By אסף.צ - אני צילמתי, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4116566

Photo: אסף .צ By אסף.צ – אני צילמתי, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4116566

Just as importantly, the South African olim introduced the potjie(pronounced “poike”) to Israel. This special pot, and the stew named for it, is an indispensable part of the Israeli Lag BaOmer celebration.

A potjie is a type of Dutch oven that was brought to South Africa by the Boer colonists from the Netherlands in the 1800s. This cast iron cauldron means “little pot.” It has three small legs and a wire handle. It can be nestled among the coals of a campfire or suspended over a flame.

To prepare the potjie stew, a little oil is heated in the Dutch oven. Then, lamb cubes are browned. Some alcohol is added for flavor, usually beer, sherry, or dessert wine. The potjie chef seasons the stew, usually very conservatively. Amazingly, garlic is not a popular ingredient. The pot is covered tightly with the lid, and the stew is left to steam slowly. It is not customary to stir the contents of the pot, so that when the potjie is ready, there are layers of flavors in the stew.

Photo: Chrstpher Jones

Photo: Chrstpher Jones

Lamb Potjie
Adapted from Joburg South

  • 4 pounds cubed lamb
    4 tbsp. olive oil
    4 onions, chopped
    5 celery stalks, chopped
    4 carrots, peeled and chopped
    3 potatoes, chopped
    1/2 lb. green beans, with the ends cut off
    2 fresh bay leaves
    2 sprigs fresh thyme
    1/2 cup flour
    2 cups chicken stock
    1 cup red wine
    1 tsp. ground coriander
    1 tsp. salt
    1 tsp. ground cumin
  1. Heat the pot over medium hot coals.
    Combine the flour, salt, cumin, and coriander.
    Coat the lamb cubes with the flour mixture.
    Heat the olive oil in the pot.
    Brown the lamb cubes.
    Take the lamb cubes out of the pot and set aside.
    Place the onions and celery in the pot, and fry them a little bit.
    Add the lamb cubes to the vegetables.
    Pour in the stock, red wine, fresh thyme, and bay leaves.
    Close the lid tightly and allow to cook for one hour.
    Add the potatoes.
    After 30 minutes, add the carrots.
    Cook for 15 minutes, and add the green beans.
    Wait 10 minutes.
    Serve with rice, noodles, or fresh pita bread.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Freedom and Kitniyot For All!

standard Friday April 15th, 2016 Leave a response
Photo by Miansari66 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Miansari66
Photo by Miansari66 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Miansari66
Photo by CSIRO

Photo by CSIRO

In 1989 the Law Committee of the Rabbinical Assembly of Israel issued a responsum to the question Ashkenazi Jews ask every Passover: “Why are we not permitted to eat kitniyot(legumes), while Sephardic Jews are?” The Rabbinical Assembly concluded that this is a “mistaken custom” and that Ashkenazi Jews are permitted to consume kitniyot as well. This responsum technically only applies to people living in Israel. Ashkenazi Jews who live elsewhere, will need to clear this with their own rabbi if they would also like to change their family’s custom. Also this Passover season for the first time the Conservative movement has authorized Ashkenazi Jews to eat kitniyot.

If we go back to the source, the Torah has the following to say about chametz: First, we are told not to eat unleavened bread during the seven days of Passover, and to remove all leavened bread from our homes. Jews living in the diaspora added an additional day to make sure they complied with the observance of Passover on the right days of the Hebrew Calendar.

Seven days shall ye eat unleavened bread; howbeit the first day ye shall put away leaven out of your houses; for whosoever eateth leavened bread from the first day until the seventh day, that soul shall be cut off from Israel. (Exodus 12:15).

Then the Torah instructs us not to have any leavened bread on our property or temporary place of residence during the seven (or eight in the diaspora) days of Passover.

Seven days shall there be no leaven found in your houses; for whosoever eateth that which is leavened, that soul shall be cut off from the congregation of Israel, whether he be a sojourner, or one that is born in the land.

The significance of Passover is summarized by Moses in Exodus 13:3:

And Moses said unto the people: ‘Remember this day, in which ye came out from Egypt, out of the house of bondage; for by strength of hand the LORD brought you out from this place; there shall no leavened bread be eaten.’

The rabbis who wrote the Mishnah (10-220 CE) ruled that five types of grain were permitted for baking matzah. These are wheat, barley, spelt, rye, and oats. When these grains are mixed with water they ferment very quickly. They instructed that the dough must be mixed and baked in eighteen minutes or the matzah would not be considered “unleavened bread.” When analyzing rice and sesame seeds, these rabbis noted that when these were combined with water, they decayed, they did not ferment. Therefore, they were not considered chametz.

In the thirteenth century, the rabbis of Provence prohibited the consumption of rice andkitniyot during Passover. This custom spread throughout Europe. No clear reason for this new prohibition was ever provided. Some rabbis in other cities objected to this ruling, saying that it was a mistaken custom, a foolish custom, and an unnecessary stringency.

The question facing the rabbis today is, may they change a mistaken custom? They concluded that they may and they must. Doing away with this custom will return the focus of Passover to the original intent of the Torah. It will enhance the enjoyment of Passover by offering a greater variety of foods. The new ruling will make the celebration more affordable. One of the best results of this initiative is that it will lessen friction between the Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews, who will finally be able to enjoy the same foods together at the Seder.

I am an “Ashkefardic” Jew, from a “mixed” family. The Passover battles of my grandparent’s generation are legendary. The preparations for the Seder always started with a fight, which wasn’t even about the relatives. The topic was the same every year: rice or potatoes. The end result was a lose-lose truce, neither rice nor potatoes. Matzah was the only starch served during the festive meal.

Thanks to this new ruling, there may be more shalom bayit, or peace in the home. Some of thekitniyot permitted by the Sephardic Passover Guide are “Anise, Beans, Black Eyed Peas, Buckwheat, Canola Oil, Caraway, Chickpeas, Confectioners’ sugar with corn starch, Coriander, Corn, Corn Syrup, Cumin, Fennel, Fenugreek, Flax Seeds, Hemp, Kasha, Lentils, Licorice, Millet, Mustard, Peanuts, Popcorn, Poppy Seeds, Rice, Sesame Seeds, Snow Peas, Soy Oil, Corn Oil, Soy, String Beans, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu (from soy).”

This is a wonderful development for vegetarians and vegans. For the uninitiated, here are some of the most beloved recipes with kitniyot for Passover.

In the Jewish communities of Sicily, Egypt, Turkey, and Greece fava beans ripened just as Passover was celebrated. It was traditional to include a dish with fava beans at the Seder.

Photo by Boo Lee

Photo by Boo Lee

Braised Artichokes with Fava Beans (Anjinara con Aves)
Adapted from “The Sephardic Kitchen” by Rabbi Robert Sternberg

  • 8 artichokes
  • 1 pound fava beans
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 4 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh dill, minced
  • Salt
  • Black pepper
  1. Place all the ingredients except the salt, pepper, and fresh dill in a large pot.
  2. Bring to a boil, and then reduce the heat to a simmer.
  3. Cover the pot and cook for 45 minutes.
  4. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and dill.

The Syrian Jewish community has a beautiful rice dish reserved for special occasions such as the Passover Seder. This dish is famous for the beautiful golden hue and rich aroma extracted from the saffron it is spiced with.

Saffron Rice (Riz w’Zafran)
Adapted from Aromas of Aleppo by Poopa Dweck

  • 1 cup white rice
  • 3 saffron threads
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • Pinch of ground cardamom
  • 1/2 cup toasted almond, pine nuts, or pistachios
  1. Heat the olive oil in a heavy pot.
  2. Add the onion, and sauté over medium heat until translucent.
  3. Pour 1 1/2 cups of cold water into the pot.
  4. Bring to a boil.
  5. Season with the saffron, cinnamon stick, salt, and cardamom.
  6. Add the rice and bring back to a boil.
  7. Lower the heat and allow to simmer for 30 minutes.
  8. Sprinkle with the toasted nuts when ready to serve.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Bake Your Own Matza in a Pop-Up Passover Tabun

standard Monday April 4th, 2016 2 responses

In my family, the Passover celebration begins long before the Seder. Preparing for our festive meal is a big part of the fun. One of my favorite traditions is our annual matza baking party. My husband Howard designs and builds a temporary cinder-block tabun (Biblical oven) especially for the occasion. I aspire to bake a  matza with a really authentic flavor. In order to get that, I look for flour milled from heirloom seeds that were native to Ancient Egypt.

Stone oven by Jarkko Laine

Stone oven by Jarkko Laine

How should you build your own tabun? Here is an easy guide for a 1-hour brick oven. Be sure to use fireproof bricks! I suggest that you use natural wood charcoal, although the Ancient Israelites used dry dung for fuel.

In Deuteronomy 16:3, matza is described as lechem oni, or “bread of poverty.” What was the bread of poverty in Ancient Egypt? According to the Karaites, barley was the grain of the poor. They bake their matza from the flour of this Ancient Egyptian staple. I wanted to try it this year, so we baked barley matza.

Karaite Barley Matza

  1. Set a timer for eighteen minutes. From the moment the water touches the flour, that is the total time permitted for the preparation of kosher for Passover matza.
  2. Place the flour in a bowl.
  3. Pour the water into the flour, and knead it quickly.
  4. Pinch off an olive-sized piece of dough.
  5. Say the blessing for taking challah:

    Baruch Ata A-Do-Nay Elo-haynu Melech HaOlam Asher Kidishanu B’Mitzvotav V’Tziyvanu L’Hafrish Challah, Harei Zeh Challah. (Blessed are You, Lord our G-d, King of the Universe, Who has sanctified us with His commandments and commanded us to separate Challah, this is Challah).

  6. You must burn this piece of dough completely, in a fire that is separate from the one you are using to bake the matza.
  7. Pull off plum-sized balls of dough.
  8. Flatten them with your hands.
  9. Pierce the flattened dough all over with a fork.
  10. Place in the hot tabun.
  11. The matza is ready when it is crisp, and slightly browned.

As we pulled the rustic, golden-brown flat breads out of the oven, their delicious aroma wafted around our yard. The tabun-baked barley matza was softer than the store-bought wheat type. We ate our matza hot, right as it emerged from the charcoals. There was a satisfying crunch around the edges as we bit into it. It had a hearty, slightly nutty flavor. For me, this “bread of poverty” is a delicacy!

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice

Persian Purim Halvah

standard Monday March 7th, 2016 Leave a response

What do Persian Jews prepare for each other to celebrate Purim? I have always wondered about this. The Persian Jewish community is very insular, and I have never had the opportunity to ask. Thanks to the development of social media, it was possible for me to approach a group of Persian Jewish women to inquire. The special Purim treat of the Persian Jews is saffron halvah.

Saffron halvah is not like the white sesame halvah I am used to from Israel. A base of flour and oil is cooked, and then flavored with nuts and spices. Its consistency is more akin to that of a brownie. The resulting halvah has a deep golden tone, and is redolent of saffron and rosewater. The soft pastry is accentuated with the crunch of almonds and pistachios. It is a Purim treat that truly harkens back to Queen Esther’s palace.

Saffron Halvah
Adapted from the Iran Chamber Society

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 7/8 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup rosewater
  • 12 threads of saffron
  • 1 tablespoon almonds, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon pistachios, crushed
  1. Heat the oil in a heavy pot.
  2. Mix in the flour.
  3. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly.
  4. When the dough thickens, turn off the flame.
  5. In a separate pot, bring the water and sugar to a boil.
  6. Add the saffron to release its golden color and aroma.
  7. Add the rosewater.
  8. Turn off the heat.
  9. Pour the sugar syrup into the dough.
  10. Mix thoroughly.
  11. Pour the halvah onto a serving platter.
  12. Flatten the dough with a spatula or spoon.
  13. Garnish with crushed almonds and pistachios.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Sephardic Tu b’Shevat Confection

standard Thursday January 21st, 2016 Leave a response

Sephardic families are known for their tradition of hospitality toward friends, neighbors, and even strangers. During Tu b’Shevat, some Turkish Jews prepare a special dessert called trigo koço. “Trigo” means “wheat” in Spanish. This sweet wheat berry dish originated in the Middle East, and traveled with the Jews to Spain. Following the expulsion from Spain in 1492, the Jews took it with them to the Ottoman Empire. To this day, every guest who stops by for a Tu b’Shevat visit at their home is offered a bowl of trigo koço with a cup of hot mint tea.

Trigo Koço

  • 1 1/4 cup wheat berries
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 tbsp. orange blossom water
  • 2 tbsp. rose water
  • 1 1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • Walnuts
  1. Pour the wheat berries and 4 cups of water into a heavy pot.
  2. Bring the water to a boil, and then lower the flame.
  3. Allow the wheat to simmer for 1 hour.
  4. Turn off the heat, and stir in the sugar, cinnamon, orange blossom water, and rose water.
  5. Serve garnished with walnuts.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

The Maccabees’ Victory Feast

standard Saturday December 5th, 2015 Leave a response
Judah Maccabee coin.

Judah Maccabee coin.

Two thousand years ago, a group of Judean rebels called the Maccabees waged a guerrilla war against the Seleucid Empire. This war was sparked by a decree issued by King Antiochus that forbade Jewish religious practice. Hanukkah is the celebration of the Maccabees’ military victory. “Hanukkah” means “dedication,” in honor of the purification and rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem. The Maccabees celebrated the rededication with a victory feast.

The Maccabean Revolt lasted seven years. During that time, the men neglected their crops and herds. In Ancient Israel, meat was only served on special occasions. The rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem was the type of ceremony that merited a savory meat stew. Since their flocks were lean, the Maccabees probably caught wild deer for this gathering.

Cuneiform tablet with oldest recorded recipe for venison stew

Cuneiform tablet with oldest recorded recipe for venison stew

Here is the oldest recorded recipe for venison stew, imprinted on a clay tablet from the time of King Hammurabi (1700 BCE). It is a recipe from Babylonia, written in Akkadian. This recipe predates the Maccabees by 1,500 years, yet meat was still prepared in this manner during their time. The stew was served with flat-bread, wine, and pressed, dried fig cake for dessert.

Babylonian Venison Stew

Adapted from The Oldest Cuisine in the World: Cooking in Mesopotamia by Jean Bottero

For the marinade:

  • 3 1/2 lbs. venison stew meat
  • 3 cups red wine
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 2 bay leaves

Gamo_a_la_cazuela (1)For the stew:

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 leeks, chopped
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • 1/2 cup marinade (recipe above)
  • Sea salt
  1. Place the venison and all the ingredients for the marinade in a large glass bowl.
  2. Cover tightly with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 24 hours.
  3. Preheat the oven to 265°F.
  4. Heat the olive oil in a Dutch oven.
  5. Mix in the cumin, coriander, onions, garlic, and leeks.
  6. Remove the venison from the marinade and add it to the pot.
  7. Once the meat is browned, add the stock and marinating liquid.
  8. Bring to a boil.
  9. Cover the pot and place in the oven.
  10. Bake the stew for 90 minutes.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Honoring the Women with Dairy Dishes

standard Saturday November 28th, 2015 Leave a response
Photo by ToastieIL
Photo by ToastieIL

In the United States, Hanukkah is associated with potato latkes and the brave Judean men fighting for freedom. But in some Sephardic communities, the seventh day of Hanukkah is focused on dairy dishes and the brave Judean women.

More than 2,000 years ago, a group of Judean rebels called the Maccabees vanquished the Seleucid Empire. Hanukkah means “dedication,” and refers to the purification of the Temple in Jerusalem following the Maccabee victory.

One indispensable protagonist in this victory is Judith, even though she lived 400 years before the time of the Maccabees, during the reign of King Nebuchadnezzar. In Judith’s story, General Holofernes was charged with besieging the fictitious city of Bethulia (symbolizing Jerusalem). A beautiful young widow, Judith ventured outside the city walls. Holofernes tried to seduce her, inviting her into his tent, where she entertained him with salty cheese, wine and conversation. He became so inebriated that he fell into a deep sleep. Seizing this opportunity, Judith cut his head off with his own sword, then paraded around Holofernes’ encampment with his head, so terrifying his soldiers that they fled. The Maccabees were said to have been inspired by Judith’s bravery to fight until they were victorious.

So in some Sephardic communities, the seventh day of Hanukkah is reserved to honor Judith’s bravery. This is called chag habanot, the festival of girls and women. Dairy dishes are served to commemorate the cheese that helped bring down Holofernes.

Konafa a la crème is a dairy pastry popular throughout the Levant. It is composed of four parts: the pastry, the filling, the syrup and the garnish. You may substitute rose water for the orange blossom water.

Photo by StateofIsrael https://www.flickr.com/photos/86083886@N02/

Photo by StateofIsrael https://www.flickr.com/photos/86083886@N02/

Konafa a la Crème

Adapted from The Book of Jewish Food by Claudia Roden

Make the pastry:

• 1 lb. frozen filo dough

• 8 oz. butter

  1. Melt the butter.
  2. Shred the filo dough in a food processor.
  3. In a large bowl, mix the shredded filo dough with the butter.
  4. Set aside.

Make the filling:

• 5½ cups cold milk

• 4 tbls. sugar

• ¼ cup rice flour

  1. Place the rice flour in a small bowl.
  2. Add enough cold milk to mix into a paste.
  3. Heat the rest of the milk until it boils.
  4. Stir in the rice flour paste.
  5. Simmer for 15 minutes while stirring.
  6. Mix in the sugar.
  7. Set aside to cool.

Make the syrup:

• 1 ¼ cups water

• 2 ½ cups sugar

• 2 tbls. orange blossom water

• 2 tbls. freshly squeezed lemon juice

  1. Boil all the ingredients for 15 minutes.
  2. Cool in the refrigerator.

Make the garnish:

• 2/3 cup shelled raw pistachios

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Spread the pistachios on a cookie sheet.
  3. Toast for 8 minutes.
  4. Cool and chop coarsely.

Compose the cake:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350.
  2. Put half the pastry dough in a 12-inch round porcelain casserole dish, working it with your fingers so it coats the bottom.
  3. Cover the pastry dough with the milk filling.
  4. Top filling with the rest of the pastry.
  5. Bake for 60 minutes.
  6. Remove from the oven, pour the cold syrup over the pie and sprinkle on the pistachios.

Published in the Weavers Way Coop Shuttle.

Hebrew Cookies for Simchat Torah

standard Sunday October 4th, 2015 Leave a response

Simchat Torah is the celebration of the never-ending circle of Torah. One wonderful way to celebrate is by baking cookies in the shapes of the first word in the Torah.

Simchat Torah services begin at sunset. The last chapter of Deuteronomy is read, followed by the first chapter of Genesis. This is the only time of the year that the Torah scrolls are removed from the ark at night.

The first phrase in Genesis is “In the beginning.” In Hebrew, this is written in one word, “Bereishit.”

photo

The whole family can have fun mixing sugar cookie dough, rolling it out, and cutting out the shapes of the Hebrew letters. You may use Alef-Bet cookie cutters, or a knife. A fun tactile activity is to sculpt the letters with the dough. This is much less fussy than rolling and cutting it.

Refrigerated sugar cookie dough is perfect for this if you are pressed for time. Alternatively, if you are too busy to bake, you may purchase some Alef Bet cookies. If you like, you may decorate your cookies with icing and colorful sugar sprinkles. As you bite into each sweet letter, you will be reminded of the sweetness of learning Torah.

Sugar Cookies

Adapted from Alton Brown

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 stick butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon milk
  1. Combine all the ingredients in a bowl.
  2. Cover and refrigerate for 2 hours.
  3. Preheat the oven to 375°F.
  4. Roll out the dough.
  5. Cut out the letter shapes.
  6. Place the cookies on a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper.
  7. Bake for about 10 minutes.

Published in The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.